Protein: Building Muscle with Whey Protein

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protein

OF THE HUNDREDS OF NUTRITIONAL MUSCLE BUILDING OPTIONS OUT THERE, THE CONSUMPTION OF WHEY PROTEIN POST-WORKOUT IS ONE OF THE MOST PROVEN.

From a business standpoint, selling a protein supplement is a catch-22. It’s pretty clear that consumers want to buy them, whether because of the convenience, taste, scientific proof, marketing, or all four. Making a protein supplement isn’t easy, however. The high-quality dairy proteins (namely, whey and casein) that scientists have spent the most time studying in healthy, resistance-exercising subjects aren’t dirtcheap. This, combined with the fact that the marketplace is saturated with products (i.e. highly competitive), means that profit margins are frequently as thin as your average Facebook friendship. The catch-22 arises from the fact that it is widely believed that a supplement brand will not be taken seriously unless it offers consumers a protein. But let’s leave the business aspects aside and focus on building muscle. Now that you’ve purchased a jug of your favorite protein supplement, Infinite Pro™, what do you need to know to put it to the greatest possible muscle-building use? The “Top 12” list shown here answers this question. It was largely derived from a paper I received from Stu Phillips, PhD, of McMaster University, one of the world’s leading scientists studying the effects of combining resistance exercise with protein supplementation. The paper, which Phillips coauthored with Keith Baar, PhD, of the University of California at Davis, reviewed the latest scientific research on the subject. When reading through the list, please note that unless otherwise specified, wherever I’ve used the term “protein,” it refers to proteins isolated from milk, almost always whey, which is the most studied protein to date. Whether or not the same statements can be made for other commonly eaten proteins (e.g. beef, chicken, tuna), or whole foods in general, remains to be seen.